Layout Tab for each sheet or one layout tab for all sheets

Discussion in 'AutoCAD' started by DallasNYC, Jan 16, 2005.

  1. DallasNYC

    DallasNYC Guest

    I work on small projects (10 sheets +/-) and I usually use a separate layout tab for each sheet. I then plot each one using 'plot area = layout'. I have however seen other drawings that put all the sheets on one layout tab and use plot area = view. I'm curious what is the more common way of doing things for drawings with multiple sheets? What are the pros and cons of doing it each way. One pro of having all the sheets on one drawing is this limits the number of regens.

    Thanks..
     
    DallasNYC, Jan 16, 2005
    #1
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  2. DallasNYC

    teiarch Guest

    I use one for each sheet in case I need to use a different plot style for different sheets. More a question of finding stuff but in reality, a habit carried over from R14 (1 layout =1 file) translates to 1 layout = 1 tab) in later versions.

    I also usually do NOT put more than 5 layouts in one file and break things up according to what's being viewed. Floor plans = 1 file, elevations and sections = 1 file, details = 1 file. This cuts donw on regens and viewport caching.

    You'll probably get as many answers both ways; in the end use what you understand best.

    When regens and viewport caching get to be a hassle, add more ram, turn off viewports until ready to plot, and/or save the file on the least complicated layout. Then, when you open the file, switch to only one other layout, plot or make changes, switch back, then save.

    I also use a separate xref drawing, an R14 habit as well.
     
    teiarch, Jan 17, 2005
    #2
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  3. One layout for one sheet. This is kinda what it's designed for. Especially
    with the advent of the publish command where you can print all layouts (from
    one or more drawings) in one shot. It would also simplify the number of
    page setups. You can use the same pagesetup for multiple layouts. Where if
    you have multiple pages, on one layout, you have to have a different
    pagesetup for each one with different 'window' coordinates. (If you don't
    use pagesetup's, you should try it. )

    Casey


    layout tab for each sheet. I then plot each one using 'plot area = layout'.
    I have however seen other drawings that put all the sheets on one layout tab
    and use plot area = view. I'm curious what is the more common way of doing
    things for drawings with multiple sheets? What are the pros and cons of
    doing it each way. One pro of having all the sheets on one drawing is this
    limits the number of regens.
     
    Casey Roberts, Jan 17, 2005
    #3
  4. DallasNYC

    Gordon Price Guest

    To my mind, all the sheets on one layout is simply someone who doesn't want
    to stop using R14. Probably a good chance text is still single line DText
    too ;) As for all sheets on seperate layouts in one drawing, or seperate
    DWGs for each sheet, I prefer the latter because of the graphic control it
    gives you. I put all my info in one base file for each floor, then in the
    floor plan sheet I xref it in and freeze the layers I don't need, while in
    the Electrical Plan sheet I xref it in, make things like walls and stairs
    and plumbing grey, but the eletrical and lighting layers are visible and
    black. It really makes the info the drawing is about pop out. With all the
    sheets in one DWG you can't do this, because you can only control visibility
    of items in a viewport, you can't change color, linetype, lineweight,
    plotstyle, etc. I guess you could put multiple Xrefs in MS, and multiple
    sheets on multiple layouts of one DWG, but then that drawing starts to get
    huge, and if you loose the drawing or corrupt the drawing, all eggs are in
    one basket. Not to mention that you can't have two people working on the
    same set. Not an issue for a sole proprietor, until the day they get big
    enough to need a little help, and the whole system becomes the bottle neck.

    Best,
    Gordon
     
    Gordon Price, Jan 18, 2005
    #4
  5. DallasNYC

    OLD-CADaver Guest

    << With all the sheets in one DWG you can't do this, because you can only control visibility of items in a viewport, you can't change color, linetype, lineweight, plotstyle, etc. >>

    We've discussed this before, and I think I see where we disagree. We, too, split things along discipline lines, the difference is one discipline may still span a dozen or two drawings.

    The building on which I'm currently will have 19 structural drawings. All 19 will be in a single file for the very same reasons you've posted here. We want the background data, ie: plumbing, electrical, mechanical, etc. to be in background. Rather than merge all those into 19 different drawing files and control layers in each, we prefer to do it once.
     
    OLD-CADaver, Jan 18, 2005
    #5
  6. DallasNYC

    DallasNYC Guest

    Thanks for all the reply's. Looks like I'm on the right track using seperate tabs.

    Thanks Again,

    Dallas
     
    DallasNYC, Jan 27, 2005
    #6
  7. DallasNYC

    jmcintyre Guest

    We use a separate file for each sheet for the following, with one layout tab in each file. The file then has the drawing number as its name. This way, if others not involved with the project need to find a drawing, it is easier. We have also done this to make batch plotting with 3rd party software easier. Also the frequency of file corruption seems to be increasing, so when you have one file containing all the drawings you risk losing everything. Another good reason as expressed by others is the regen time required with multiple layout tabs in one file.
    All in all it keeps things simple and from trial and error, we have found this to be the least prone to problems.
     
    jmcintyre, Jan 31, 2005
    #7
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